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2012 The Dinosaur Project

Title: The Dinosaur Project

Year: 2012

Runtime: 83 min

Genre: adventure, thriller, action, horror

Director: Sid Bennett

Country: United Kingdom

 

 

 

 

PLOT:  Found footage of an expedition into the Congo jungle where a team of explorers stumbles upon a colony of Dinosaurs. Set in the deepest, wildest throngs of the African jungle, The Dinosaur Project is an ambitious quest by a team of western explorers, hoping to find a water creature, whose origins are rooted in myth and fantasy. The head of the expedition, an Indiana Jones type, has his plans for a successful trip spoiled though, after his helicopter is brought down by a flock of strange enormous birds and to add to his troubles, he also has to look after his stowaway son Luke. Luke is the film’s main narrator; with an arsenal of personal cameras at his disposal, the young techno-geek captures every minute of this project, which becomes a lesson in survival. The team quickly discover all is not well in the jungle, and encounter some extraordinary creatures, which civilization has presumed extinct for millions of years!

 

 

Actors:

Natasha Loring

Matt Kane

Peter Brooke

TRAILER:

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Arcusaurus

Name: »rainbow lizard«
Length: 2 – 3 m
Height: 1 m
Weight: 100 kg
Diet: herbivore
Time: Jurassic (190 MYA)
Location: Africa (South Afirca)

Arcusaurus is an extinct genus of sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic (Hettangian to Sinemurian stages) of South Africa.
Arcusaurus was first named by Adam Yates, Matthew Bonnan and Johann Neveling in 2011 and the type species is Arcusaurus pereirabdalorum. The generic name is derived from Latin arcus, “rainbow”, a reference to the Rainbow Nation. The specific name honours Lucille Pereira and Fernando Abdala who discovered the fossils .
Arcusaurus is known from two fragmentary skeletons collected in March 2006 at the Spion Kop Heelbo site from the upper Elliot Formation in Senekal in Free State. The holotype, BP/1/6235, consists of a partial skull. Some limb bones and vertebrae are included in the material. Both specimens represented juvenile individuals. From detailed features the describers concluded these were not the young of either Aardonyx or Massospondylus.
Arcusauruses were a few meters long. The skull has a length of about twelve inches. The back of it is rather broad, rounded muzzle with a slightly pinched snout tip. The orbit is very large, but that might come from a young age. There are at least eighteen teeth in the jaw.
A phylogenetic study of Arcusaurus found it to be a basal sauropodomorph, placing it as the sister taxon of Efraasia and all of the more derived sauropodomorphs. Since Efraasia is known from the Norian stage of the Late Triassic, the close relationship with Arcusaurus implies that there was a 35-million-year ghost lineage of sauropodomorphs stretching from Late Triassic forms to Arcusaurus. However, Arcusaurus possesses many features unique to more advanced groups included in the clade Plateosauria, raising doubts about the results of the phylogenetic analysis.
A new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur, Arcusaurus pereirabdalorum, sp. nov., is named and described on the basis of a partial, disarticulated but associated skull and dispersed cranial and postcranial elements from at least two individuals. Arcusaurus is part of a distinctive local fauna from the upper Elliot Formation (Lower Jurassic) in the Senekal District, Free State, South Africa. It can be diagnosed by various details of the premaxilla, nasal, and dentary in the skull and the shape of the distal caudal vertebrae. The taxon displays an unusual mix of characteristics. It lacks several synapomorphies of Plateosauria (Plateosaurus + Massospondylus and all descendants of their most recent common ancestor) but does display other derived characteristics that are otherwise known only from less inclusive clades within Plateosauria. In a cladistic analysis a position outside Plateosauria as the sister group of the clade of Efraasia + more-derived sauropodomorphs is supported; however, this position was not found to be a significantly better explanation of the data as a relatively derived position within Plateosauria. If the basal position for Arcusaurus is accepted, then a divergence from other sauropodomorphs in the middle Norian and a ghost lineage up to 35 Ma is implied. No other non-plateosaurian sauropodomorphs are known from the Jurassic, making Arcusaurus a potentially relictual taxon in the Early Jurassic.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
(unranked): Eusaurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Genus: Arcusaurus
Species: A. pereirabdalorum Yates et al., 2011

Jurassic Journeys article

Daemonosaurus

Name: »demon lizard«
Length: 1,5 m
Height: 0,4 m
Weight: 12 kg
Diet: carnivore
Time: Triassic (205 MYA)
Location: North America

Daemonosaurus (meaning “demon reptile” in Greek) is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Triassic of New Mexico. Fossils have been found from deposits in the Chinle Formation that latest Triassic in age. While theropods had diversified into several specialized groups by this time, Daemonosaurus is a basal theropod that lies outside the clade Neotheropoda. Daemonosaurus is unusual among early theropods in that it had a short skull and long protruding teeth. The type species of Daemonosaurus, D. chauliodus, was described in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B in 2011. Because the description has not yet been published, the genus is considered a nomen nudum. The generic name means “demon reptile” in Greek, while the specific name, derived from Greek, means “prominent toothed” in reference to its procumbent front teeth.
Daemonosaurus is known from a single holotype, C-4-81, consisting of a skull, some vertebrae, and ribs collected from the Ghost Ranch quarry in New Mexico in the 1980s. Ghost Ranch is famous for an abundance of fossils of the similar theropod Coelophysis. Fossils of Coelophysis were present on the same block that contained the skull of Daemonosaurus, which was uncovered by a volunteer at the State Museum of Pennsylvania.
Based on the proportions of related theropods, Daemonosaurus is estimated to have been around 1.5 m (5 feet) long. The skull of Daemonosaurus differs considerably from all other Triassic theropods. The snout is short and bears large premaxillary and maxillary teeth in the upper jaw. Procumbent teeth project forward from the tips of the upper and lower jaws.
Daemonosaurus lies outside the clade Neotheropoda, a group that includes more advanced Triassic theropods like Coelophysis and their descendants. With such a basal position, it represents a lineage that extended from the earliest radiation of dinosaurs in the Middle Triassic with forms such as Eoraptor and Herrerasaurus from South America. A phylogenetic analysis conducted in its original description found D.s chauliodus to be the sister taxon of a clade consisting of Tawa, a theropod that was described from Ghost Ranch in 2009, and the Neotheropoda. Although the two theropods are closely related, Tawa was found in a quarry that is slightly older than Ghost Ranch.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Node: Eusaurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Genus: Daemonosaurus
Species: D. chauliodus Sues et al., 2011

Daemonosaurus, Hodari Nundu
Daemonosaurus, Jeffery Martz
Artist: Camila Alli Chair
A.k.a.: Iguana-Teteia
Contact: c_chair@hotmail.com
Homepage: http://www.iguana-teteia.deviantart.com
This image is used by permission and is Copyright© of Camila Alli Chair.
Caption
Artist: Camila Alli Chair A.k.a.: Iguana-Teteia Contact: c_chair@hotmail.com Homepage: http://www.iguana-teteia.deviantart.com This image is used by permission and is Copyright© of Camila Alli Chair.

Birds strong sense of smell came from Dinosaurs

Birds are known more for their senses of vision and hearing than smell, but new research suggests that millions of years ago, the winged critters also boasted a better sense for scents.
Read the rest of this entry »

Spinostropheus

Name: »spined vertebrae«
Length: 4 m
Height: 1,5 m
Weight: 300 kg
Diet: carnivore
Time: Jurassic (145 MYA)
Location:  Africa (Niger)

Spinostropheus ((Greek for “spined vertebrae”); pronounced SPY-no-STROH-fee-us) is a genus of small ceratosaurian dinosaur that lived in the late Jurassic period of Niger. Once thought to be a species closely related to the abelisaurs (Sereno et al. 2002), subsequent studies have confirmed the original interpretation as a basal ceratosaur closely related to Elaphrosaurus (Carrano & Sampson, 2008).

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Infraorder: Ceratosauria
Genus: Spinostropheus Sereno et al. 2002
Species: S. gautieri (Lapparent, 1960 [originally Elaphrosaurus gautieri])

Artist: Ezequiel Vera A.k.a.: maniraptora Contact: ezequiel.vera@gmail.com Homepage: http://maniraptora.deviantart.com/ http://www.maniraptora.blogspot.com/ This image is used by permission and is Copyright© of Ezequiel Vera.
Caption
Artist: Ezequiel Vera A.k.a.: maniraptora Contact: ezequiel.vera@gmail.com Homepage: http://maniraptora.deviantart.com/ http://www.maniraptora.blogspot.com/ This image is used by permission and is Copyright© of Ezequiel Vera.
Artist: Nobu Tamura
Contact: nobu.tamura@yahoo.com
Homepage: http://ntamura.deviantart.com/
http://www.palaeocritti.com/
This image is used by permission and is Copyright© of Nobu Tamura.
Caption
Artist: Nobu Tamura Contact: nobu.tamura@yahoo.com Homepage: http://ntamura.deviantart.com/ http://www.palaeocritti.com/ This image is used by permission and is Copyright© of Nobu Tamura.

Pradhania

Name: »for Pradhan«
Length: 4 m
Height: 1,3 m
Weight: 200 kg
Diet: herbivore
Time: Jurassic (196-190 MYA)
Location: Asia (India)

Pradhania is a genus of sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Sinemurian-age (Early Jurassic) Dharmaram Formation of India. The type species is P. gracilis, named by T. Kutty, Sankar Chatterjee, Paul Upchurch, and Peter Galton. It was a basal sauropodomorph of modest size, only about four meters (13 ft) long, and is known from fragmentary remains.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Genus: Pradhania
Species: P. gracilis Kutty et al., 2007

Plateosauravus

Name: »grandfather of Plateosaurus«
Length: 8 m
Height: 3 m
Weight: 3 tons
Diet: herbivore
Time: Triassic (217-204 MYA)
Location: Africa (South Africa)

Plateosauravus (“grandfather of Plateosaurus”) is a basal sauropodomorph of uncertain affinities from the late Triassic of South Africa.
Sidney Haughton named Plateosaurus cullingworthi in 1924 from a partial skeleton, type specimen SAM 3341, 3345, 3347, 3350-51, 3603, 3607. The specific name honoured collector T.L. Cullingworth. Friedrich von Huene reassessed it in 1932 as belonging to a new genus, that he named Plateosauravus. Jacques van Heerden reassigned it to Euskelosaurus in 1976, and this has been how it was usually considered. However, recent study indicates that Euskelosaurus is based on undiagnostic material and thus a nomen dubium; in his series of sauropodomorph and basal sauropod papers, Adam Yates has recommended no longer using Euskelosaurus and has suggested the use of Plateosauravus instead for what is normally thought of as Euskelosaurus.
More than a dozen additional partial skeletons have been found in the Kruger National Park after a discovery by game warden Adriaan Louw on 27 March 1995. These include juvenile individuals.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Infraorder: Prosauropoda
Family: unknown
Genus: Plateosauravus
Species: P. cullingworthi Sidney Haughton, 1924

Fusuisaurus

Name: »Fusui lizard«
Length: up to 30m
Height: 6 m
Weight: 40 tons
Diet: herbivore
Time: Cretaceous (110 MYA)
Location: Asia (China)

Fusuisaurus (meaning “Fusui lizard” from the name of the county where it was discovered) is a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of China. Fragmentary postcranial remains of this animal have been discovered in 2001 in the Napai Formation of Guangxi, China and consist of the left ilium, left pubis, anterior caudals, most of the dorsal ribs and distal end of the left femur. This sauropod has been described as a basal titanosauriform.
The type species is F. zhaoi, named in honour of Chinese paleontologist Zhao Xijin.
Fusuisaurus was very basic in the group of Titanosauriformes and was seen as an indication that the clade has its origin in Asia. It is considered one of the largest dinosaurs of the Cretaceous.
This dinosaur is known for a very incomplete skeleton, including ilium and pubis claims, caudal vertebrae, ribs and dorsal part of the left femur. The remains, although fragmentary, are evidence of the existence of one of the largest sauropods of the Cretaceous, comparable in size to the American Sauroposeidon (about 30 meters long). The fossils suggest that this dinosaur was a representative of a group of primitive titanosauriforms, which includes most of the known Cretaceous sauropods. The name comes from Fusui County, where the fossils were found, while the specific name honors the Chinese paleontologist Zhao Xijin.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Infraorder: Sauropoda
(unranked): Titanosauriformes
Genus: Fusuisaurus
Species: F. zhaoi Mo et al., 2006

Erliansaurus

Name: »Erlian lizard«
Length: 3 m
Height: 1,2 m
Weight: 250 kg
Diet: herbivore
Time: Cretaceous (70-65 MYA)
Location: Asia (China)

Erliansaurus was a genus of dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian stage, around 65-70 million years ago). It was a therizinosaurid theropod. Fossils of Erliansaurus were found in China.
The type species, Erliansaurus bellamanus, was described by Xu, Zhang, Sereno, Zhao, Kuang, Han, and Tan in 2002, based on a partial skeleton.
Erliansaurus was a bipedal herbivore that reached 3 meters long and 1.2 high, with an estimated weight of 250 kilograms. Had a small head at the end of a long neck, a big belly to make room for the intestines needed to digest cellulose and large hands with claws to strip the leaves off the trees.
The remains were found Erliansaurus Iren Dabasu Formation in Inner Mongolia of China, sharing the place with Neimongosaurus tericinosáurio also, but being different from each other. The genus name comes from a small town near China, Erliansaurus is considered a link between primitive and more advanced Therizinosauria Therizinosauridae. Studies are expected future serve to clarify the diversity of Therizinosauridae.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Family: Therizinosauridae
Genus: Erliansaurus
Binomial name: Erliansaurus bellamanus Xu et al., 2002

Embasaurus

Name: “River Emba lizard”
Length: 8 m
Height: 3,5 m
Weight: 4 tons
Diet: carnivore
Time: Cretaceous (142-128 MYA)
Location: Asia (Kazakhstan)

Embasaurus (meaning: lizard from above (the river) Emba) is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils have been found in Kazakhstan in central Asia. As it is known only from two fragmentary vertebrae, Embasaurus is considered a nomen dubium, taxonomic placeholder lacking sufficient evidence to establish the existence of a bona fide genus. It is named after the Emba River, and it is believed to have lived during the Berriasian stage, around 140 million years ago. According to the Theropod Database, a personal website designed by Mickey Mortimer, further research may suggest that Embasaurus may be a basal tyrannosauroid.
The type species, Embasaurus minax, was described by the Soviet paleontologist Anatoly Riabinin in 1931.
E.minax the sole species is based on two dorsal centra. One is platycoelus, the other incomplete. Platycoulus dorsal vertebrae often occur in older taxa, such as Kaijiangosaurus lini, and suggest that this form may have been relatively primitive. They are not known in carnosaurs so there is no reason to consider this poorly known species a carnosaur.
The body length of the creature was about 8 m, height 3.5 m and weight about 4 tons.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Family: Tyrannosauroidea
Genus: Embasaurus
Species: E. minax

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