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New Study On Dinosaur Size

Body Size, Credit - Eoin J. O’Gorman, David W. E. HoneDinosaurs were not only the largest animals to roam the Earth — they also had a greater number of larger species compared to all other back-boned animals — scientists suggest in a new paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The researchers, from Queen Mary, University of London, compared the size of the femur bone of 329 different dinosaur species from fossil records. The length and weight of the femur bone is a recognised method in palaeontology for estimating a dinosaur’s body mass.
They found that dinosaurs follow the opposite pattern of body size distribution as seen in other vertebrate species. For example, within living mammals there tends to be few larger species, such as elephants, compared to smaller animals, such as mice, which have many species. The evidence from fossil records implies that in contrast there were many species of larger dinosaurs and few small species.
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Plants Responsible For Giant Sauropods

Planteating sauropod, wikidinoThe long necked sauropod dinosaurs were the largest land animals ever to walk the Earth — but why were they so large? A decade ago, a team of plant ecologists from South Africa suggested that this was due to the nature of the plant food they ate. However, these ideas have fallen out of favour with many dinosaur researchers. Now Liverpool John Moores University’s (LJMU’s) Dr David Wilkinson and Professor Graeme Ruxton of University of St Andrews, Scotland, argue that this idea still has legs.

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New Feathered Tyrannosaur

Meet the largest feathered animal in history – an early version of Tyrannosaurus rex, clad in long, fuzzy filaments. This newly discovered beast has been named Yutyrannus huali, a mix of Mandarin and Latin that means “beautiful feathered tyrant”. And its existence re-opens a debate about whether the iconic T.rex might have been covered in feathers.
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Atlantosaurus

Name: »Atlas lizard«
Length: 20 m
Height: 6 m
Weight: 25 tons
Diet: herbivore
Time: Jurassic (154-150 MYA)
Location: North America

Atlantosaurus (pronounced at-LAN-tuh-SAWR-us) (meaning “Atlas lizard”) is a dubious genus of sauropod dinosaur. The type specimen, found by Arthur Lakes in the Morrison Formation of Colorado, USA, was described by Othniel Charles Marsh, a Professor of Paleontology at Yale University (then called Yale College), in 1877 as “Titanosaurus” montanus. Marsh soon learned that the name Titanosaurus had already been used earlier that year to describe a different sauropod, so he re-named it Atlantosaurus montanus. The skeletal remains discovered were initially distinguished by their immense size and by the pleurocoels (air-filled pockets) in the vertebrae. However, since the time of its discovery, these features have been found to be widespread among sauropods, making it nearly impossible to distinguish the two known vertebrae of Atlantosaurus from those of its relatives. Since it is unclear whether or not Atlantosaurus montanus actually represents a distinct species, it is considered a nomen dubium (“dubious name”). Some researchers consider it a likely synonym of Apatosaurus ajax.
Atlantosaurus was one of the dinosaurs to be described from the United States, during the infamous 19th century Bone Wars, during which scientific methodology suffered in favor of pursuit of academic acclaim.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Infraorder: Sauropoda
Family: Diplodocidae
Subfamily: Apatosaurinae Marsh, 1877
Genus: Atlantosaurus Marsh, 1877
Species: A. montanus (Marsh, 1877) (originally Titanosaurus)
Synonyms: Titanosaurus montanus Marsh, 1877 (preoccupied)

Asiatosaurus

Name: »Asian lizard«
Length: 20 m
Height: 5 m
Weight: 13 tons
Diet: herbivore
Time: Cretaceous (130 MYA)
Location: Asia (China, Mongolia)

Asiatosaurus (pronounced AYE-see-at-tuh-SAWR-us) (meaning “Asian lizard”) was a genus of herbivorous sauropod dinosaur which lived during the early Cretaceous. Its fossils have been found in China and Mongolia. It is known only from teeth, making it difficult to rely on information until more specimens are found to expand our knowledge.
The type species, A. mongolensis, was described by Osborn, in 1924. A. kwangshiensis was described by Hou, Yeh and Zhao, in 1975 based on teeth from the Napai Formation of Guangxi, China. Both are now classified as nomina dubia or are considered questionable and considered a senior synonym Chiayusaurus.

This sauropod reached approximately 20 meters in length and weighted up to 13 tons.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Infraorder: Sauropoda
Genus: Asiatosaurus
Species:
-A. mongolensis Osborn, 1924
-A. kwangshiensis Hou, Yeh & Zhao, 1975

T-Rex Was Bigger!

A new study reveals that T. rex grew more quickly and reached significantly greater masses than previously estimated. In a departure from earlier methods, the new study uses mounted skeletons to generate body mass estimates.
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Big Birds In Dinosaur Era

An enormous prehistoric bird, which might have resembled a very big ostrich, lived alongside dinosaurs around 83 million years ago, according to new research.
The bird, called Samrukia nessovi after the mythical Kazakh Phoenix, lived in what is now Kazakhstan. It is described in the latest Royal Society Biology Letters.
The discovery confirms “that big birds were living alongside Cretaceous non-avian dinosaurs,” lead author Darren Naish said. “In fact, these big birds fit into the idea that the Cretaceous wasn’t ‘a non-avian dinosaurs-only theme park.’ Sure, non-avian dinosaurs were important and big in ecological terms, but there was at least some space for other land animals.”
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Wasps In Dinosaur Eggs

Rotting dinosaur eggs were good eats, as well as home, to numerous scavenging insects, according to a new study in the journal Paleontology.
Jorge Genise of the Argentine Museum of Natural Sciences and colleague Laura Sarzetti came to that conclusion after finding exceptionally well-preserved fossils of insect cocoons in a broken, 70-million-year-old titanosaur egg.
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Dinosaur temperature measured

Sauropod dinosaurs, the enormous plant-eating dinos with long tails and necks, had body temperatures ranging from 96.3 to 100.8 degrees Fahrenheit (35,5°C – 38°C) – making them as warm as most mammals – including people.
Because body temperature usually rises the larger an animal gets, the findings, published in the latest issue of Science, suggest huge sauropods had mechanisms for cooling themselves off.
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Spinosaurid found in Australia

A relative of a giant fish-eating dinosaur that dwarfed T. rex once roamed Australia, say researchers, providing growing evidence for the worldwide distribution of many dinosaur branches.
They add the find provides “weak” evidence to support the theory that Africa was the first of the continents to split from Gondwanaland.
Co-author, Thomas Rich of Museum Victoria, says the claims, published in Biology Letters, are based on a four-centimeter (1.6-inch) neck vertebra found by Michael Cleeland and George Caspar at Dinosaur Cove near Cape Otway, Victoria.
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