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New Discovery About Giant Spinosaurus

Spinosaurus, Tyler Keillor, Lauren Conroy, and Erin FitzgeraldScientists are unveiling what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago, providing the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment. The fossils also indicate that Spinosaurus was the largest known predatory dinosaur to roam Earth, measuring more than nine feet longer than the world’s largest Tyrannosaurus rex specimen.
These findings, to be published Sept. 11 in the journal Science online at the Science Express website, are also featured in the October National Geographic magazine cover story available online Sept. 11. In addition, Spinosaurus will be the subject of a new exhibition at the National Geographic Museum, opening Sept. 12, as well as a National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m.
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World’s Oldest Dinosaur Embryo

Dino embryo, D. MazierskiThe great age of the embryos is unusual because almost all known dinosaur embryos are from the Cretaceous Period. The Cretaceous ended some 125 million years after the bones at the Lufeng site were buried and fossilized.
Led by University of Toronto Mississauga paleontologist Robert Reisz, an international team of scientists from Canada, Taiwan, the People’s Republic of China, Australia, and Germany excavated and analyzed over 200 bones from individuals at different stages of embryonic development.
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Alvarezsaurid Eggs Discovered

An Argentine-Swedish research team has reported a 70-million-year-old pocket of fossilized bones and unique eggs of an enigmatic birdlike dinosaur in Patagonia.
“What makes the discovery unique are the two eggs preserved near articulated bones of its hind limb. This is the first time the eggs are found in a close proximity to skeletal remains of an alvarezsaurid dinosaur,” says Dr. Martin Kundrát, dinosaur expert from the group of Professor Per Erik Ahlberg at Uppsala University.
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Europe

List of dinosaurs that roamed Europe:

 

  1. Acanthopholis
  2. Aepisaurus
  3. Agnosphitys
  4. Agrosaurus
  5. Ajkaceratops
  6. Allosaurus
  7. Alocodon
  8. Altispinax
  9. Ampelosaurus
  10. Angloposeidon
  11. Anoplosaurus
  12. Aragosaurus
  13. Archaeopteryx
  14. Arcovenator
  15. Arenysaurus
  16. Aristosuchus
  17. Asylosaurus
  18. Atsinganosaurus
  19. Aviatyrannis
  20. Balaur
  21. Barilium
  22. Baryonyx
  23. Becklespinax
  24. Betasuchus
  25. Bihariosaurus
  26. Blasisaurus
  27. Bothriospondylus
  28. Bradycneme
  29. Calamosaurus
  30. Calamospondylus
  31. Callovosaurus
  32. Camarillasaurus
  33. Camelotia
  34. Camptosaurus
  35. Canardia
  36. Cardiodon
  37. Ceratosaurus
  38. Cetiosauriscus
  39. Cetiosaurus
  40. Chondrosteosaurus
  41. Compsognathus
  42. Concavenator
  43. Craspedodon
  44. Craterosaurus
  45. Cruxicheiros
  46. Cryptosaurus
  47. Cumnoria
  48. Dacentrurus
  49. Delapparentia
  50. Dinheirosaurus
  51. Dolichosuchus
  52. Dollodon
  53. Draconyx
  54. Dracopelta
  55. Dromaeosauroides
  56. Dubreuillosaurus
  57. Duriatitan
  58. Duriavenator
  59. Echinodon
  60. Efraasia
  61. Elopteryx
  62. Emausaurus
  63. Eotyrannus
  64. Eousdryosaurus
  65. Erectopus
  66. Eucamerotus
  67. Euronychodon
  68. Europasaurus
  69. Europelta
  70. Eustreptospondylus
  71. Galveosaurus
  72. Genusaurus
  73. Gideonmantellia
  74. Halticosaurus
  75. Histriasaurus
  76. Hungarosaurus
  77. Hylaeosaurus
  78. Hypselosaurus
  79. Hypselospinus
  80. Hypsilophodon
  81. Iguanodon
  82. Iliosuchus
  83. Ischyrosaurus
  84. Iuticosaurus
  85. Juratyrant
  86. Juravenator
  87. Koutalisaurus
  88. Kukufeldia
  89. Lexovisaurus
  90. Liassaurus
  91. Liliensternus
  92. Lirainosaurus
  93. Lophostropheus
  94. Loricatosaurus
  95. Losillasaurus
  96. Lourinhanosaurus
  97. Lourinhasaurus
  98. Lusitanosaurus
  99. Lusotitan
  100. Macrurosaurus
  101. Magnosaurus
  102. Magyarosaurus
  103. Mantellisaurus
  104. Megalosaurus
  105. Metriacanthosaurus
  106. Miragaia
  107. Mochlodon
  108. Neosodon
  109. Neovenator
  110. Normanniasaurus
  111. Nuthetes
  112. Ohmdenosaurus
  113. Oplosaurus
  114. Ornithodesmus
  115. Ornithopsis
  116. Orthomerus
  117. Owenodon
  118. Paludititan
  119. Pantydraco
  120. Pararhabdodon
  121. Pelecanimimus
  122. Pelorosaurus
  123. Phyllodon
  124. Piveteausaurus
  125. Plateosaurus
  126. Pneumatoraptor
  127. Poekilopleuron
  128. Polacanthus
  129. Priodontognathus
  130. Proa
  131. Proceratosaurus
  132. Procompsognathus
  133. Proplanicoxa
  134. Pterospondylus
  135. Pyroraptor
  136. Regnosaurus
  137. Rhabdodon
  138. Ruehleia
  139. Saltriosaurus
  140. Sarcolestes
  141. Sarcosaurus
  142. Scelidosaurus
  143. Scipionyx
  144. Sciurumimus
  145. Sellacoxa
  146. Sellosaurus
  147. Stegosaurus
  148. Stenopelix
  149. Stokesosaurus
  150. Streptospondylus
  151. Struthiosaurus
  152. Suchosaurus
  153. Tarascosaurus
  154. Tastavinsaurus
  155. Taveirosaurus
  156. Teinurosaurus
  157. Telmatosaurus
  158. Tethyshadros
  159. Thecodontosaurus
  160. Thecospondylus
  161. Torvosaurus
  162. Trimucrodon
  163. Turiasaurus
  164. Valdoraptor
  165. Valdosaurus
  166. Variraptor
  167. Wellnhoferia
  168. Xenoposeidon
  169. Yaverlandia
  170. Zalmoxes
  171. Zby

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